Here is a useful piece of evidence for those of you competing in CX this weekend. It details a few reasons why a new United Nations report has called Latin America the most insecure region on the globe. The card also suggests that development is necessary to combat insecurity. Affs might find this card helpful as an impact booster, while negs might use it to support alternate causality solvency deficit arguments. Find it by clicking below.

 

THE U.N. SAYS LATIN AMERICA IS THE MOST INSECURE REGION IN THE WORLD

BESANT 11/14/2013 (Alexander, staff writer, GlobalPost, UN report: Latin America is

the least secure region in the world, reprinted by Salon at

http://www.salon.com/2013/11/14/un_report_latin_america_is_the_least_secure_region

_in_the_world_partner/)

Latin America is the least secure region of the world, according to a new United Nations report.

The report said that inequality, a lack of law enforcement and corrupt justice systems were the reasons for this insecurity, including huge rates of murder and robbery.

The authors noted that there have been about 100,000 murders per year in the region during the last decade.

“If you look at any other region, Latin America unfortunately has the record in terms of homicides,” said UN Development Program (UNDP) director for Latin America and the Caribbean, Heraldo Munoz.

The 2013-2014 Regional Human Development Report, Citizen Security with a Human Face, said robberies have increased three-fold in the region in the last quarter-century.

Homicide rates have stabilized but the perception of security has worsened.

The report looks at six threats, including street crime; violence and crime committed by and against youth; gender-based violence; political corruption; violence committed by state actors and organized crime.

“Citizen security is a sensitive issue which preoccupies many political decision-makers and reverberates in the heat of electoral campaigns,” UNDP Administrator Helen Clark said in a statement.

“It is a crucial issue for several regions, including Latin America and the Caribbean, because without peace there can be no development, and without development there can be no lasting peace.”

 

Let us know how you use this card in the comments, and don’t forget to submit your case for a free case critique!

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