Tiangong-1

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Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Wed Aug 17, 2011 2:26 pm

China's Tiangong-1, a multipurpose docking station most closely akin to the ISS, may be up by the end of this month.

This has three major effects for debate --

1. It bolsters the Aff argument that other nations are weaponzing
2. It helps politics links (it is especially difficult to cut our space program while China is increasing their's
3. It provides critics of #1-2 a platform to make more recent, updated answers

For claim #1 -- proves China is weaponizing;
Leonard David, 8-16-11. Widely syndicated Space columnist @ Space Daily and Contributing space writer for MSNBC. "China poised to launch its first space lab sooner than expected," MSNBC,
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44168426/ns ... nce-space/.
There are observers that see China's playbook in space, as on the Earth, as a bid to become a world strategic power, not just a regional power.

Indeed, space for China is one piece — a significant piece, but just one — of the puzzle they are assembling, some observers say. Others contend that, when the puzzle is complete, it has China as No. 1 in the world when it comes to space, with no one else in second place.


More evidence China is weaponizing
There are several points to consider regarding the imminent lofting of China's Tiangong 1, suggested Dean Cheng, a research fellow at The Heritage Foundation’s Asian Studies Center in Washington.

"The most important point is that this is developing docking techniques and technology which, in turn, means precision controls for thrusters and the like, which has obvious military/anti-satellite implications," Cheng said.


In political terms, hurling Tiangong 1 into Earth orbit, Cheng said, is another reminder that China intends to be a space player for the foreseeable future, including the realm of human spaceflight, Cheng said.

Just as China's naval aircraft carrier was launched soon after they criticized the U.S. for spending too much on defense, undertaking the Tiangong/Shenzhou 8 mission at about the same time as the U.S. space shuttle program ends "is a powerful political signal that China is ascendant, and the U.S. is descending," Cheng said.


It could cause an arms race
Yet another reflection is the extent to which China's space station initiative is going to spur intra-Asian space competition, Cheng continued. By launching a Skylab-type vehicle — even if significantly smaller — China is, nonetheless, going to set records for Asians in space, he said.

"In some ways, this will underscore the extent to which China is ahead of India and Japan. This will be layered atop ongoing tensions among them: Beijing-Tokyo (the Senkakus/Diaoyutai incident of last year) and Beijing-New Delhi (ongoing tensions about border demarcations),” Cheng said.

With New Delhi indicating an interest in anti-satellite capabilities, Cheng noted that Beijing's ability to sustain people in space, and associated military technology benefits — not to mention the expansion of their Tianlian data-relay satellite network nominally needed for piloted space telemetry — will be a sign of China’s edge over India in space.

Cheng’s forecast: “I think the next decade, depending on everyone’s economic development, may well see a heating up of the Asian space competition.”

For claim #2 -- politics;
Leonard David, 8-16-11. Widely syndicated Space columnist @ Space Daily and Contributing space writer for MSNBC. "China poised to launch its first space lab sooner than expected," MSNBC,
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44168426/ns ... nce-space/.
“Some members of Congress may try to use China’s progress in human space flight as an excuse to criticize the Obama administration’s space policy. Some U.S. defense analysts are likely to claim the orbiting space lab has a military purpose,” said UCS’s Kulacki.


For claim #3 -- answering weaponization;
Leonard David, 8-16-11. Widely syndicated Space columnist @ Space Daily and Contributing space writer for MSNBC. "China poised to launch its first space lab sooner than expected," MSNBC,
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44168426/ns ... nce-space/.
But in reality, Kulacki told Space.com, Tiangong 1 is just a small step forward along the same path the United States and the Soviet Union crossed decades ago.

"Neither country discovered any practical military advantage from putting people in space. There is no indication China's human spaceflight program is motivated by the pursuit of military objectives, but even if it is, space professionals in the United States and Russia already know it is a fool’s errand," Kulacki said.


For claim #3 -- answering politics
Leonard David, 8-16-11. Widely syndicated Space columnist @ Space Daily and Contributing space writer for MSNBC. "China poised to launch its first space lab sooner than expected," MSNBC,
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44168426/ns ... nce-space/.
"Given a new milestone in China’s space program, how best to gauge what this may mean for the United States? That’s a much harder question to answer, said Joan Johnson-Freese, professor of national security studies at the Naval War College in Newport, R.I.

"Frankly, I don't think it will have much impact in the U.S. beyond the usual core of space enthusiasts and supporters," Johnson-Freese said. "With the U.S. economy in the state that it’s in, people worried about jobs and 401(k)s … and people feeling that Congress is focused more on politics than fixing things … I don't think what the Chinese are doing in space will register or have much impact among those who could make a difference to the U.S. space program."


More evidence answering politics
The Chinese have only flown three piloted missions since 2003 "and there are really no aggressive plans that I have seen, although there has been some reporting in the media about the possibility of a piloted Chinese moon mission. How real that is, I think, is an open question," Launius said.

Absent a serious effort by the Chinese, Launius doesn't think too many American leaders will be too concerned about increasing American funding for human spaceflight.

"Of course, having said that, if China landed on the moon, went to Tranquility Base, picked up our flag, brought it back and sold it on eBay, I think Americans would be very excited," Launius suggested.
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Wed Aug 17, 2011 2:33 pm

For an even more thorough read of AMAZING new China Weaponization evidence, check out;

Dean Cheng, 8-16-11 -- Research Fellow in Chinese Affairs @ Heritage Foundation. "China’s Space Program: A Growing Factor in U.S. Security Planning," Heritage Foundation, http://www.heritage.org/Research/Report ... y-Planning.
"The growing Chinese counterspace capabilities threaten American space superiority, the ability of the United States to support friends and allies in the western Pacific, and American deterrence of potential aggression. The U.S. government needs to take steps to ensure that it maintains the ability to secure space superiority. Such a position of strength is necessary for the Sino–American space relationship to develop along the oft-touted lines of mutual respect and mutual benefit."
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Wed Aug 24, 2011 8:16 am

They also won't be deterred by the recent failure of their rocket;
http://www.space.com/12704-china-space- ... ilure.html
The failure of a Chinese Long March rocket last week will not affect the country's plans to launch a 19,000-pound space station module later this year...
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Wed Aug 31, 2011 8:10 am

China is hurrying to launch the Tiangong-1 soon. Why the hurry? Space Daily explains;
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Time_ ... g_999.html
"Apart from the emotion, there are also some practical reasons to light this candle. Launch systems, infrastructure and personnel cannot stay "ready" for too long. Eventually things start to wear out. This applies to the Tiangong spacecraft as much as the Long March rocket. If things have been certified as flight worthy, it makes sense to use them while they remain this way.

There's also the question of weather. We need fairly good conditions at the launch site, ground tracking stations, and on the high seas, where China will deploy its fleet of tracking vessels. Waiting too long threatens to disrupt conditions with cold blizzards and choppy seas"
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Wed Sep 07, 2011 7:52 am

That hurry is yielding results: they plan to launch it by the end of the month.
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Tiang ... tember_999.
htmlDue to the launch failure of the experimental orbiter SJ-11-04, the Chinese unmanned space module Tiangong 1, the prototype of the Chinese space experiment station, which was scheduled to launch in late August, is now expected to launch in late September, according to the China Manned Space Engineering Office.
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Mon Sep 12, 2011 12:26 pm

Getting tired of hearing about the Tiangong-1 yet? ...No? Good! Neither is China:
http://www.space.com/12888-china-space- ... aunch.html
China's space ambitions serve multiple national goals. By charting achievements in space, the nation is driving the development of its science and technology community, increasing its military might, and sending a powerful signal about its status to people at home and abroad. "Space is very much an indicator of a country's willingness to look into the future," Johnson-Freese said. "It has a lot of symbolic resonance as well."
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:25 am

Save the date! In a week, this baby is going in the air:
http://www.wsbt.com/news/sns-rt-us-chin ... 7432.story
China will next week launch an experimental craft paving the way for its first space station, an official said on Tuesday, bringing the growing Asian power closer to matching the United States and Russia with a long-term manned outpost in space. The Tiangong 1, or "Heavenly Palace," will blast off from a site in the Gobi Desert around September 27-30, adding a high-tech sheen to China's National Day celebrations on October 1, the Xinhua news agency said
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Wed Sep 21, 2011 8:25 am

Great new card today -- Tiangong-1 has military uses and spooks the international community, no cooperation forthcoming
IOL News, 9-19-11 -- Independent Online News (New Zealand), "Beijing leaps into space exploration," http://www.iol.co.za/scitech/science/sp ... -1.1140704.
Once Tiangong-1 enters its predefined orbit, the unmanned Shenzou-8 will follow it a few weeks later to test remote-controlled docking manoeuvres. Astronauts are scheduled to visit the Palace of Heaven twice next year on the Shenzhou-9 and Shenzhou-10 missions, and to set up a mini-space station comprised of linked capsules. China's experimental spacelab cannot measure up to the 1973 US Skylab or to Russia's Mir of 1986 in terms of size, but it does serve a purpose as a first step. A full space station designed to be permanently occupied is scheduled to be operational by around 2020. A main cabin 18 metres long and 4.2 metres in diameter will be attached to two 14.4-metre-long work modules. At 60 to 70 tons, this space station is still small in comparison with the ISS, which weighs in at 450 tons. But as the joint project between Russia and the US will be have been closed down by 2020, at the latest, China will be the only nation with a manned outpost in space. That would be a great success for the young spacefaring nation, which first sent an astronaut into space in 2003, and technologically remains on a level the US reached in the 1960s. “Roughly speaking, the Chinese programme now is at the stage where the US was in the Gemini years,” Johnson-Freese said in a reference to the 1960s Nasa spaceflight programme. “But a space station is part of the infrastructure China is planning to build in space - deliberately different from the Apollo approach,” she added. The station is part of an ambitious space programme that will build a satellite network for a navigation system and is already preparing for an unmanned lunar landing. The project is under the mandate of the People's Liberation Army, and pursues military purposes even if peaceful intentions are always stressed. Chinese generals know how important satellite communication is for warfare. “Because a high percentage of space technology is of dual use, there will be indirect benefits for the Chinese army, much like the Apollo technology benefited the US military,” Johnson-Freese said. But cooperation from the United States, Russia and Europe with the Chinese in their new international space station is not on the horizon. “That will not happen, for political and technical reasons,” Jones said. “The US rejects it, and it has genuine strategic reasons for doing so.”
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Thu Sep 22, 2011 8:15 am

Dr. Morrison Jones from Austrailia says not to be too worried about Tiangong-1...yet:
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Mythb ... g_999.html
Yes, it's a wonderful program, and we've been waiting a long time to see Tiangong fly. But please don't confuse it with the next step in China's space program. When the final space station is built, it will eclipse the modestly sized Tiangong laboratory in terms of size, performance and achievements.


Jiao Weixin, a Chinese space scientist, says not to get too carried away immediately -- the task at hand isn't simple:
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Tiang ... n_999.html
"Rendezvous and docking are difficult because it is like asking two racing cars to keep a distance of 1 meter between them," he said. The mission requires two craft, traveling at speeds of 28,000 km/h, to enter the same orbit and connect with precision, he said.
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:40 pm

You'll never guess who is rooting for the Tiangong -- NASA!
http://dailycaller.com/2011/09/21/top-n ... ploration/
“We haven’t talked about the Chinese,” Bolden said. “We can’t work with the Chinese right now. But I’m rooting for them. They’re probably going to put a spacecraft called Shenzhou into orbit here, hopefully by the end of the year. It’s going to be the first capsule of their space station. And the reason they are doing that is that we are not allowing them to be partners right now. So they’re going alone. They need to be successful to drive us.”
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Tue Sep 27, 2011 8:23 am

The day approacheth...
http://english.people.com.cn/202936/7605154.html
Last-minute preparations for the launch of the Tiangong-1 spacecraft began at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center on Monday, meaning the vehicle can soon embark on a mission that will eventually have it dock with a spaceship, according to the center.
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Thu Oct 06, 2011 10:05 am

Without much fanfare, the day arrived:
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-09-2 ... -u-s-.html
China launched its first space laboratory module yesterday in a step toward a manned station orbiting Earth, two months after the final shuttle mission halted the U.S.’s ability to put people into orbit.
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Thu Oct 06, 2011 10:10 am

Some, however, considered the event monumental:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-15089720
The successful launch of the Tiangong-1 space station by China is an event of huge geopolitical significance, just as the orbiting of China's first astronaut was in 2003.
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Thu Oct 06, 2011 10:56 am

Inadvertently, China played "American the Beautiful" on a video of the docking http://bit.ly/oYX2SI
IT was supposed to be a patriotic tribute to China's technological prowess. Instead, a video showing the launch of China's first space station module inadvertently glorified the country's biggest rival.
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Re: Tiangong-1

Postby brubaie » Fri Oct 07, 2011 8:03 am

Since that small mishap, it has all gone pretty smoothly for Tiangong-1:
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/China ... n_999.html
China's first space lab module were in good condition and all tests went on "smoothly" during the past week, according to a statement issued by the country's space project authorities Thursday.
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